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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As a one time very disillusioned new Qashqai owner I never thought I'd be looking at a Nissan product again. However the Juke is ticking too many boxes for me to ignore. My Qashqai suffered from too many quality control issues for me ever to have any confidence in it, so got rid of it after 18 months. For the last 2 years I have been driving a SEAT Altea 4WD "Freetrack" and it has proved the best vehicle I've owned to date, but now it's time to change.

I've been looking at the current crop of SUVs, but would really like to downsize a little but still retain an AWD/4WD capability. I've tested the the Mitsubishi ASX and found it felt built down to a price. The Hyundai iX35 looks good but is underpowered and the Kia Sportage is overpriced. Don't like the current Honda CRV, and the VW Tiguan is just too bland.

So here I am joining the Juke forum and reading as much as I can to get a feel for this strange little vehicle. Have yet to take a test drive, but will rectify that over the next few days. My initial problem will be that there are no (local) 1.6 DiG-T M6 4WD demonstrators around, so I guess I'll just have to find a "normal" CVT version and then try and scale it up in my imagination!

I've no experience of the CVT box but am hoping that with the artificial manual shift included I can gain the best of both worlds. I look forward to reading more on here and hopefully being able to contribute once I know what I'm talking about
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Found this interesting but it is a long article.......... 12inch


Some say you can't teach an old dog new tricks. But the continuously variable transmission (CVT), whichLeonardo da Vinciconceptualized more than 500 years ago and is now replacing planetaryautomatic transmissionsin some automobiles, is one old dog that has definitely learned a few new tricks. Indeed, ever since the first toroidalCVTpatentwas filed in 1886, the technology has been refined and improved. Today, several car manufacturers, including General Motors,Audi,HondaandNissan, are designing their drivetrains aroundCVTs. The different types ofCVTs: pulley-based, toroidal and hydrostatic.<h1 articlepagetitle="articlePageTitle" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: rgb0, 0, 0; font-weight: bold; font-size: 16px; margin-bottom: 5px; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; ">
</h1><h1 articlepagetitle="articlePageTitle" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: rgb0, 0, 0; font-weight: bold; font-size: 16px; margin-bottom: 5px; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; ">Pulley-basedCVTs</h1><t style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "></t><table width="200" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="0" border="0" align="right" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><t><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; "><center style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">
<br style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">Photo courtesyNissan Global</font><br style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">Pulley-basedCVT[/b]</font><br style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "></center></td></tr></t></table>Peer into a planetary automatic transmission, and you'll see a complex world of gears, brakes, clutches and governing devices. By comparison, a continuously variable transmission is a study in simplicity. MostCVTs only have three basic components:<ul style="list-style-: circle; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; margin-top: 14px; margin-right: 20px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 20px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; "><li style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 25px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 14px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; color: black; font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14pt; ">A high-power metal or rubber belt<li style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 25px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 14px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; color: black; font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14pt; ">A variable-input "driving" pulley<li style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 25px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 14px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; color: black; font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14pt; ">An output "driven" pulley[/list]CVTs also have various microprocessors and sensors, but the three components described above are the key elements that enable the technology to work.<t style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "></t><table cellpadding="3" cellspacing="0" align="center" width="400" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><t><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; "><center style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">
<br style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "></center></font></td></tr></t></table>The variable-diameter pulleys are the heart of aCVT. Each pulley is made of two 20-degree cones facing each other. A belt rides in the groove between the two cones.<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">V-belts[/b]are preferred if the belt is made of rubber. V-belts get their name from the fact that the belts bear a V-shaped cross section, which increases the frictional grip of the belt.When the two cones of the pulley are far apart (when the diameter increases), the belt rides lower in the groove, and the radius of the belt loop going around the pulley gets smaller. When the cones are close together (when the diameter decreases), the belt rides higher in the groove, and the radius of the belt loop going around the pulley gets larger.CVTs may use hydraulic pressure, centrifugal force or spring tension to create the force necessary to adjust the pulley halves.Variable-diameter pulleys must always come in pairs. One of the pulleys, known as the<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">drive pulley[/b](or<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">driving pulley[/b]), is connected to the crankshaft of the engine. The driving pulley is also called the<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">input pulley[/b]because it's where the energy from the engine enters the transmission. The second pulley is called the<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">driven pulley[/b]because the first pulley is turning it. As an<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">output pulley[/b], the driven pulley transfers energy to the driveshaft.<t style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "></t><table cellpadding="3" cellspacing="0" align="center" width="400" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><t><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; "><center style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">
<br style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">The distance between the center of the pulleys to where the belt makes contact in the groove is known as the pitch radius. When the pulleys are far apart, the belt rides lower and the pitch radius decreases. When the pulleys are close together, the belt rides higher and the pitch radius increases. The ratio of the pitch radius on the driving pulley to the pitch radius on the driven pulley determines the gear.[/b]</font></center></font></td></tr></t></table>When one pulley increases its radius, the other decreases its radius to keep the belt tight. As the two pulleys change their radii relative to one another, they create an infinite number of gear ratios -- from low to high and everything in between. For example, when the pitch radius is small on the driving pulley and large on the driven pulley, then the rotational speed of the driven pulley decreases, resulting in a lower “gear.” When the pitch radius is large on the driving pulley and small on the driven pulley, then the rotational speed of the driven pulley increases, resulting in a higher “gear.” Thus, in theory, aCVThas an infinite number of "gears" that it can run through at any time, at any engine or vehicle speed.The simplicity and stepless nature ofCVTs make them an ideal transmission for a variety of machines and devices, not just cars.CVTs have been used for years in power tools and drill presses. They've also been used in a variety of vehicles, including tractors, snowmobiles and motor scooters. In all of these applications, the transmissions have relied on high-density rubber belts, which can slip and stretch, thereby reducing their efficiency.The introduction of new materials makesCVTs even more reliable and efficient. One of the most important advances has been the design and development of metal belts to connect the pulleys. These flexible belts are composed of several (typically nine or 12) thin bands of steel that hold together high-strength, bow-tie-shaped pieces of metal.
Metal belts don't slip and are highly<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">durable[/b], enablingCVTs to handle more engine torque. They are also<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">quieter[/b]than rubber-belt-drivenCVTs
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<h1 articlepagetitle="articlePageTitle" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: rgb0, 0, 0; font-weight: bold; font-size: 16px; margin-bottom: 5px; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; ">ToroidalCVTs</h1>Another version of theCVT-- the toroidalCVTsystem -- replaces the belts and pulleys with<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">discs[/b]and<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">power rollers[/b].<t style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "></t><table width="400" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="0" border="0" align="center" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><t><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; "><center style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">
<br style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">Photo courtesyNissan Global</font><br style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">Nissan Extroid toroidalCVT[/b]</font><br style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "></center></td></tr></t></table>Although such a system seems drastically different, all of the components are analogous to a belt-and-pulley system and lead to the same results -- a continuously variable transmission. Here's how it works:<ul style="list-style-: circle; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; margin-top: 14px; margin-right: 20px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 20px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; "><li style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 25px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 14px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; color: black; font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14pt; ">One disc connects to the engine. This is equivalent to the driving pulley.<li style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 25px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 14px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; color: black; font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14pt; ">Another disc connects to the drive shaft. This is equivalent to the driven pulley.<li style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 25px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 14px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; color: black; font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14pt; ">Rollers, or wheels, located between the discs act like the belt, transmitting power from one disc to the other.[/list]<t style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "></t><table cellpadding="3" cellspacing="0" align="center" width="400" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><t><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; "><center style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">
<br style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "></center></font></td></tr></t></table>The wheels can rotate along two axes. They spin around the horizontal axis and tilt in or out around the vertical axis, which allows the wheels to touch the discs in different areas. When the wheels are in contact with the driving disc near the center, they must contact the driven disc near the rim, resulting in a reduction in speed and an increase in torque (i.e., low gear). When the wheels touch the driving disc near the rim, they must contact the driven disc near the center, resulting in an increase in speed and a decrease in torque (i.e., overdrive gear). A simple tilt of the wheels, then, incrementally changes the gear ratio, providing for smooth, nearly instantaneous ratio changes.<h1 articlepagetitle="articlePageTitle" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: rgb0, 0, 0; font-weight: bold; font-size: 16px; margin-bottom: 5px; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; ">HydrostaticCVTs</h1>Both the pulley-and-V-beltCVTand the toroidalCVTare examples of frictionalCVTs, which work by varying the radius of the contact point between two rotating objects. There is another type ofCVT, known as a hydrostaticCVT, that uses<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">variable-displacement pumps[/b]to vary the fluid flow into hydrostatic motors. In this type of transmission, the rotational motion of the engine operates a hydrostatic pump on the driving side. The pump converts rotational motion into fluid flow. Then, with a hydrostatic motor located on the driven side, the fluid flow is converted back into rotational motion.<t style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "></t><table width="400" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="0" border="0" align="center" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><t><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; "><center style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">
<br style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "></center></td></tr></t></table>Often, a hydrostatic transmission is combined with a<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">planetary gearset[/b]and<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">clutches[/b]to create a hybrid system known as a<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">hydromechanical transmission[/b]. Hydromechanical transmissions transfer power from the engine to the wheels in three different modes. At a low speed, power is transmitted hydraulically, and at a high speed, power is transmitted mechanically. Between these extremes, the transmission uses both hydraulic and mechanical means to transfer power. Hydromechanical transmissions are ideal for heavy-duty applications, which is why they are common in agricultural tractors and all-terrain vehicles.CVTBenefits</font><br style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">Continuously variable transmissions are becoming more popular for good reason. They boast several advantages that make them appealing both to drivers and to environmentalists. The table below describes some of the key features and benefits ofCVTs.<t style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "></t><table cellpadding="3" cellspacing="0" #eef4f6="#eef4f6" border="1" align="center" width="450" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><t><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td colspan="2" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; "><center style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">Advantages ofCVTs</center></font></td></tr><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; "><b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">Feature[/b]</td><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; "><b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">Benefit[/b]</td></tr><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Constant, stepless acceleration from a complete stop to cruising speed</td><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Eliminates "shift shock" -- makes for a smoother ride</td></tr><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Works to keep the car in its optimum power range regardless of how fast the car is traveling</td><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Improvedfuel efficiency</td></tr><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Responds better to changing conditions, such as changes in throttle and speed</td><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Eliminates gear hunting as a car decelerates, especially going up a hill</td></tr><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Less power loss in aCVTthan a typical automatic transmission</td><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Better acceleration</td></tr><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Better control of a gasoline engine's speed range</td><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Better control over emissions</td></tr><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Can incorporate automated versions of mechanical clutches</td><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Replace inefficient fluid torque converters</td></tr><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "></tr></t></table>
When you step on the gas pedal of a car with a continuously variable transmission, you notice the difference immediately. The engine revs up toward the rpms at which it produces the most power, and then it stays there. But the car doesn't react immediately. Then, a moment later, the transmission kicks in, accelerating the car slowly, steadily and without any shifts. In theory, a car with aCVTshould reach 60 mph (100 km/hr) 25-percent faster than the same car with the same engine and a manual transmission. That's because theCVTconverts every point on the engine's operating curve to a corresponding point on its own operating curve.If you look at the power output curve for the car without aCVT, you can see this to be true. Notice that the tachometer in this situation shows the engine revving up and down with each gear change, which is recorded as a spike in the power output curve (and which the driver feels as a jolt).CVTs are equally efficient on hills. There is no "gear hunting," because theCVTcycles steplessly down to a gear ratio appropriate for the driving conditions. A conventional automatic transmission shifts back and forth trying to find the right gear, which is far less efficient.
 

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hi welcome to the forum, be aware that the CVT in 2wd is different from that in the 4wd version
I understand that the cvt fitted to the 4wd qashqai is the same as what goes in the Juke, a lot of dealers do have 4wd demo's might be worth a ring around further afield to see whats about
good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Test drive now booked for sometime next weekend
. Have asked for a CVT but at this stage not of overiding importance. First thing is to assess the size and feel of the physical aspects of the vehicle, so model type doesn't really matter. Assuming the first hurdle is overcome I will indeed be ringing round other dealers - there are 4 or so within a reasonable commuting distance of me.

I appreciate that there are differences in the 2 CVT transmissions offered - thanks deks36 - but at this stage, trying any version would help me make up my mind!

The dealer advised me that there are now long delays in CVT 4WD versions of the Juke (I was aware of the CVT 2WD delays). He intimated that September might be the earliest date for a specific colour combination (Red with grey console for me)
.

Edited by: theforestdweller
 

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Hi and welcome to the forum forestdweller
I've actually test drove the 1.6 DiG-T M6 4WD CVT and believe me it was awesome. I did write a small paragraph about the experience I will try and locate the link..or maybe Deks if you're reading you could assist?.
I took my test drive at Colliers in Birmingham so as you're in theGloucester area it'd only be an hours trip up the M5 / M42.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
@ withoutwax - Many thanks for the tipoff re Colliers in Birmingham - I shall contact them in the morning to see if they still have that model demonstrator
.
 

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Hiya and welcome

You will find a whole load of ex Qashqai owners on the site.. unlike you I had few problems. Were you on the Qashqai club forum??

I hope you get a test drive organised but like the Qashqai - there are lengthy delays for all CVT boxes but some forward thinking dealers may have pre-ordered...

GOod luck to you

Fee x
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
@ feefeeglasgow - I had a feeling you might pick up on the fact that my description of QQ problems sounded familiar - yes I was there as R.H.P. - just as I thought I recognised your origins
. I'm sure my previous problems were a one-off, but that doesn't help at the time! Anyway time to go through the same loop again and the Juke is looking like a good prospect. SWMBO and I refer to it as a "Marmite" car - you either love it or hate it
. We like it and are very keen to see if it matches our hopes and expectations
.
 

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feefeeglasgow said:
You will find a whole load of ex Qashqai owners on the site..
And a few current QQ owners too (well, at least one
) that are still biding their time!

I've not looked in on the QQ forum recently - has anyone? I assume it's still active and going strong!
 

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I was under the impression the 4WD only comes with the CVT...no manual availble
 

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ctrollen said:
feefeeglasgow said:
You will find a whole load of ex Qashqai owners on the site..
And a few current QQ owners too (well, at least one
) that are still biding their time!

I've not looked in on the QQ forum recently - has anyone? I assume it's still active and going strong!
Still very very active, pages of posts on a daily basis!!!!! - Good to see folk coming across and a few familiar names creeping in.


I Miss it, but times change and so do our cars!!!!!!

Big hugs to all my QQ CLUB BUDDIES


Fee x
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Went for a test drive in the Juke yesterday. The demonstrator was the
1.5 diesel in Accenta trim so not representative of the model I've been
thinking of, but sufficient to decide whether the size and feel of the
vehcle felt "right" enough for me to pursue further.



I was pleasantly suprpised by how well the small diesel performed,
better than some of the reports I've read. I think I could confidently
upscale the performance to how the 1.6 DiG-T would perform and that
would be more than satisfactory ... however, this just isn't the car for
me I'm afraid, and requires too many compromises.



Main problem were the seats, just too short for comfort and in the case
of the passenger seat just too low - why oh why do manufacturers think
that passengers should have to put up with a fixed height front seat.
The car also felt too narrow inside with insufficient elbow room (we're
not giants - average height with SWMBO at 8st and me at 11st).



Boot space was also a problem - I got fed up with having to lower the
rear seats in my 3 door RAV4 whenever I wanted to carry major weekly
shopping and with the Juke it looks as if we'd be doing the same again.



Driving on the open road felt fine, but within traffic the vehicle was
just not tall enough for my (our) liking. We've got so used to the
higher position of our previous SUVs/Crossovers - even the Qashqai was
marginal due to low seats in a relatively high body style.



So there it is, and I'm very disappointed as I wanted the car to be
"right". For many, obviously it is, but we don't all drive around in the
same cars because we have preferences. As soon as we finished our test
drive we went straight back to the Hyundai dealers to arrange a further
test in the iX35. I think we've come to the conclusion that where a
compromise has to be made comfort has to come before performance. The
iX35 offers that (for us), the Juke gave us the opposite feeling - all
very subjective I know.



I hope I don't alienate anybody with this report, but felt it was worth
making. I hope to stay around here but possobly "lurk" rather than post
too often, as I'm hardly in a position to offer informed comment since I
shall not be owning a Juke
.
 

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sorry to see you were not satisfified with the Juke on test drive, but thats what a test drive is for to iron out issues, only comment i will make is as above really. Juke is built on a super mini platform so its never going to be large, for me its high enough, space could be a lttler bigger but then I could have got a Qashqai, the other cars people are comparing the Juke to are not in the same class, they are a class above so it can be unfair to compare such vehicles, each to their own it would be a boring place if we all drove same cars, good luck with your chosen purchase and keep a look in, you dont have to be an owner to enjoy this happy forum
regards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
@deks36 - I agree that many of the comparisons are not like for like vehicles. I may have fallen into the same trap and expected too much. I hope I was rational enogh to consider that the only real comparisons should be made with the likes of the 4x4 options on the Panda, Sedici and SX4, in which case the Juke is going to come out on top based on equipment levels alone. I guess I'm just not ready to downsize yet, but it has been a useful exercise and it is good to find such a knowledgable, friendly and useful forum. I shall stay and comment where I think I might have something useful to say
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ix35 very nice car was my other choice. Too big for what I need and also did not like the September plus waiting time. Good luck
 

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ForestDweller

It was a pretty fair report overall and I thinktheres nothing wrong with having your own opinion.

Whats right for one person isnt necessarily right for another and given your previous Qashqai nightmare, you want to be sure its good for you

All the best and lurk away..... You are more than welcome to get your tuppenceworth in..!!!

Take care

Fee x
 
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