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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, so I have to admit that when I ordered my Tekna 1.6 Auto I had no idea what CVT was.
I have not been able to test drive the auto Juke as none of the dealers around here have one. Whilst checking my delivery date with my dealer today (he still manages a smile as I walk through the door) he suggested I try the Qashqai CVT. Great Idea.For those of you who, like me, haven't driven one - all I can say is its fantastic. Into drive, foot down, smooth as silk. No notion of changing gear either up or down the box just constant smooth driving.
I am so glad I ordered the CVT. The wait has now become REALLY worth it.
My 2.7 Terrano Auto now seems so.................................. Jerky. Loved it before. Oh Well not long to wait.
 

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My current car (Honda Jazz) is CVT. Its a very smooth runner.
Its actually what drew me to the Juke, the newer Honda Jazz is an I-shift which was not a smooth run.
 

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Interesting, thanks Mick. It was the CVT that put me off having an auto. I've read they hunt for gears. I've previously had 2 DSG boxes and the CVT looked like a backwards step to me
 

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if i am correct the CVT idea is old, I remember it being hailed as the best thing since sliced bread back in the 80's when Ford put it in a fiesta
sure it has been much improved these days
 

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I think there are two CVT's available. The one on the 2wd is a simple CVT with no fixed ratios. On the 4wd, the CVT has 6 manually selectable fixed ratios, so you use it as a steptronic if you wish. It is very similar to one on the Quasquai that we test drove to check out the quality of the transmission. It was fine with me and I am used to the full 6 speed automatic box on a 3 Series BMW.

My wife is having the 4wd when it arrives from Japan, probably early next year, colour force red. Having a test drive of the manual2wd tomorrow.
 

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roger48,
my bottom is twitching!!
You say your wife is having the 4WD when it arrives from Japan, probably early next year, colour Force Red.
That is my spec. totally and am told end November, this year!!
Can you explain a little more fully, please.
Thanks.
 

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I can help you on that one you are in Spain roger46 in in UK
Uk spec cars are delayed due to an upgrade needed in alram system
and as the 4x4 is made in Japan technically Spain is nearer than Uk by boat

sorry for butting in
regards
 

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In addition to what deks has said, the 4x4 was originally going to made available to the UK just before xmas - I think thats still the case
 

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becks36,
please don´t apologise!
After reading your kind response, the palpitations ceased, as did the twitching in the nether region!!
 

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I was in the dealers in Montrose week past Saturday and he says he is giving me a shout to test out the 4wd auto when it comes in as demonstrator in December so... watch this space.

My wife and I are keen to get one as we have a Hinda Civic Hybrid just now with a CVT box. No problems whatsoever.

DAF and then Volvo had CVTs back in the eighties and there was no problem with them although, they did benefit from the 2 litre petrol engine they were matched to but, I think that was because the little 300 series Volvos (which were originally DAFs) were a bit heavy.

The newer CVTs still take a bit of winding up to work properly so, it will be interesting to drive the car when it arrives.

Interesting comment about the CVT on the 4wd being 6 fixed ratios. It can't be a CVT then as CVT means constantly variable. As far as I know there were only ever two kinds of CVT - one that was belt driven and the other that was chain driven.

The Juke auto will be my 7th automatic and the second one from Nissan. I had a 1.6 litre Sunny back in early nineties with a 'standard' auto box and it was very smooth as well. Although you could hear the gears changing you could never 'fee' them changing.
I believe that if you can feel gears changing in an auto box then it is not set-up correctly.

I had two Fiat Pandas around late eighties into early nineties that both had CVT gearboxes and again they were a dream to drive. The little cars would go like the clappers up to 30 mph and then start to run out of steam but, they were still very much fun to drive and at full motorway speeds as well. I have had the Pandas all over Scotland and England with no breakdowns that other Fiats were famous for and no sore backs compared to the likes of the Focus I had on a weekend trip a while back and they are supposed to be great cars... tuh!!!

So, the CVT (if that's what is in the 4wd) should make the Juke a great car to drive with a turbo backing it up.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Found this interesting but it is a long article..........


Some say you can't teach an old dog new tricks. But the continuously variable transmission (CVT), whichLeonardo da Vinciconceptualized more than 500 years ago and is now replacing planetaryautomatic transmissionsin some automobiles, is one old dog that has definitely learned a few new tricks. Indeed, ever since the first toroidal CVTpatentwas filed in 1886, the technology has been refined and improved. Today, several car manufacturers, including General Motors,Audi,HondaandNissan, are designing their drivetrains around CVTs. The different types of CVTs: pulley-based, toroidal and hydrostatic.<h1 ="articlePageTitle" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 5px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; vertical-align: line; font-weight: bold; font-size: 16px; ">
</h1><h1 ="articlePageTitle" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 5px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; vertical-align: line; font-weight: bold; font-size: 16px; ">Pulley-based CVTs</h1><table width="200" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="0" border="0" align="right" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><t style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; "><center style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">
<br style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">Photo courtesyNissan Global</font><br style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">Pulley-based CVT[/b]</font><br style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "></center></td></tr></t></table>Peer into a planetary automatic transmission, and you'll see a complex world of gears, brakes, clutches and governing devices. By comparison, a continuously variable transmission is a study in simplicity. Most CVTs only have three basic components:<ul style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; margin-top: 14px; margin-right: 20px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 20px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; vertical-align: line; "><li style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 25px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 14px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; vertical-align: line; color: black; font-size: 10pt; list-style-: outside; line-height: 14pt; list-style-: disc; ">A high-power metal or rubber belt<li style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 25px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 14px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; vertical-align: line; color: black; font-size: 10pt; list-style-: outside; line-height: 14pt; list-style-: disc; ">A variable-input "driving" pulley<li style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 25px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 14px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; vertical-align: line; color: black; font-size: 10pt; list-style-: outside; line-height: 14pt; list-style-: disc; ">An output "driven" pulley[/list]CVTs also have various microprocessors and sensors, but the three components described above are the key elements that enable the technology to work.<table cellpadding="3" cellspacing="0" align="center" width="400" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><t style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; "><center style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">
<br style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "></center></font></td></tr></t></table>The variable-diameter pulleys are the heart of a CVT. Each pulley is made of two 20-degree cones facing each other. A belt rides in the groove between the two cones.<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">V-belts[/b]are preferred if the belt is made of rubber. V-belts get their name from the fact that the belts bear a V-shaped cross section, which increases the frictional grip of the belt.When the two cones of the pulley are far apart (when the diameter increases), the belt rides lower in the groove, and the radius of the belt loop going around the pulley gets smaller. When the cones are close together (when the diameter decreases), the belt rides higher in the groove, and the radius of the belt loop going around the pulley gets larger. CVTs may use hydraulic pressure, centrifugal force or spring tension to create the force necessary to adjust the pulley halves.Variable-diameter pulleys must always come in pairs. One of the pulleys, known as the<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">drive pulley[/b](or<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">driving pulley[/b]), is connected to the crankshaft of the engine. The driving pulley is also called the<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">input pulley[/b]because it's where the energy from the engine enters the transmission. The second pulley is called the<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">driven pulley[/b]because the first pulley is turning it. As an<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">output pulley[/b], the driven pulley transfers energy to the driveshaft.<table cellpadding="3" cellspacing="0" align="center" width="400" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><t style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; "><center style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">
<br style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">The distance between the center of the pulleys to where the belt makes contact in the groove is known as the pitch radius. When the pulleys are far apart, the belt rides lower and the pitch radius decreases. When the pulleys are close together, the belt rides higher and the pitch radius increases. The ratio of the pitch radius on the driving pulley to the pitch radius on the driven pulley determines the gear.[/b]</font></center></font></td></tr></t></table>When one pulley increases its radius, the other decreases its radius to keep the belt tight. As the two pulleys change their radii relative to one another, they create an infinite number of gear ratios -- from low to high and everything in between. For example, when the pitch radius is small on the driving pulley and large on the driven pulley, then the rotational speed of the driven pulley decreases, resulting in a lower “gear.” When the pitch radius is large on the driving pulley and small on the driven pulley, then the rotational speed of the driven pulley increases, resulting in a higher “gear.” Thus, in theory, a CVT has an infinite number of "gears" that it can run through at any time, at any engine or vehicle speed.The simplicity and stepless nature of CVTs make them an ideal transmission for a variety of machines and devices, not just cars. CVTs have been used for years in power tools and drill presses. They've also been used in a variety of vehicles, including tractors, snowmobiles and motor scooters. In all of these applications, the transmissions have relied on high-density rubber belts, which can slip and stretch, thereby reducing their efficiency.The introduction of new materials makes CVTs even more reliable and efficient. One of the most important advances has been the design and development of metal belts to connect the pulleys. These flexible belts are composed of several (typically nine or 12) thin bands of steel that hold together high-strength, bow-tie-shaped pieces of metal.
Metal belts don't slip and are highly<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">durable[/b], enabling CVTs to handle more engine torque. They are also<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">quieter[/b]than rubber-belt-driven CVTs
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<h1 ="articlePageTitle" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 5px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; vertical-align: line; font-weight: bold; font-size: 16px; ">Toroidal CVTs</h1>Another version of the CVT -- the toroidal CVT system -- replaces the belts and pulleys with<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">discs[/b]and<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">power rollers[/b].<table width="400" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="0" border="0" align="center" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><t style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; "><center style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">
<br style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">Photo courtesyNissan Global</font><br style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">Nissan Extroid toroidal CVT[/b]</font><br style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "></center></td></tr></t></table>Although such a system seems drastically different, all of the components are analogous to a belt-and-pulley system and lead to the same results -- a continuously variable transmission. Here's how it works:<ul style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; margin-top: 14px; margin-right: 20px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 20px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; vertical-align: line; "><li style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 25px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 14px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; vertical-align: line; color: black; font-size: 10pt; list-style-: outside; line-height: 14pt; list-style-: disc; ">One disc connects to the engine. This is equivalent to the driving pulley.<li style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 25px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 14px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; vertical-align: line; color: black; font-size: 10pt; list-style-: outside; line-height: 14pt; list-style-: disc; ">Another disc connects to the drive shaft. This is equivalent to the driven pulley.<li style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 25px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 14px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; vertical-align: line; color: black; font-size: 10pt; list-style-: outside; line-height: 14pt; list-style-: disc; ">Rollers, or wheels, located between the discs act like the belt, transmitting power from one disc to the other.[/list]<table cellpadding="3" cellspacing="0" align="center" width="400" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><t style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; "><center style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">
<br style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "></center></font></td></tr></t></table>The wheels can rotate along two axes. They spin around the horizontal axis and tilt in or out around the vertical axis, which allows the wheels to touch the discs in different areas. When the wheels are in contact with the driving disc near the center, they must contact the driven disc near the rim, resulting in a reduction in speed and an increase in torque (i.e., low gear). When the wheels touch the driving disc near the rim, they must contact the driven disc near the center, resulting in an increase in speed and a decrease in torque (i.e., overdrive gear). A simple tilt of the wheels, then, incrementally changes the gear ratio, providing for smooth, nearly instantaneous ratio changes.<h1 ="articlePageTitle" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 5px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; vertical-align: line; font-weight: bold; font-size: 16px; ">Hydrostatic CVTs</h1>Both the pulley-and-V-belt CVT and the toroidal CVT are examples of frictional CVTs, which work by varying the radius of the contact point between two rotating objects. There is another type of CVT, known as a hydrostatic CVT, that uses<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">variable-displacement pumps[/b]to vary the fluid flow into hydrostatic motors. In this type of transmission, the rotational motion of the engine operates a hydrostatic pump on the driving side. The pump converts rotational motion into fluid flow. Then, with a hydrostatic motor located on the driven side, the fluid flow is converted back into rotational motion.<table width="400" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="0" border="0" align="center" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><t style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; "><center style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">
<br style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "></center></td></tr></t></table>Often, a hydrostatic transmission is combined with a<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">planetary gearset[/b]and<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">clutches[/b]to create a hybrid system known as a<b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">hydromechanical transmission[/b]. Hydromechanical transmissions transfer power from the engine to the wheels in three different modes. At a low speed, power is transmitted hydraulically, and at a high speed, power is transmitted mechanically. Between these extremes, the transmission uses both hydraulic and mechanical means to transfer power. Hydromechanical transmissions are ideal for heavy-duty applications, which is why they are common in agricultural tractors and all-terrain vehicles.CVT Benefits</font><br style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">Continuously variable transmissions are becoming more popular for good reason. They boast several advantages that make them appealing both to drivers and to environmentalists. The table below describes some of the key features and benefits of CVTs.<table cellpadding="3" cellspacing="0" ="#eef4f6" border="1" align="center" width="450" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><t style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td colspan="2" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; "><center style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">Advantages of CVTs</center></font></td></tr><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; "><b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">Feature[/b]</td><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; "><b style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; ">Benefit[/b]</td></tr><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Constant, stepless acceleration from a complete stop to cruising speed</td><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Eliminates "shift shock" -- makes for a smoother ride</td></tr><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Works to keep the car in its optimum power range regardless of how fast the car is traveling</td><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Improvedfuel efficiency</td></tr><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Responds better to changing conditions, such as changes in throttle and speed</td><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Eliminates gear hunting as a car decelerates, especially going up a hill</td></tr><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Less power loss in a CVT than a typical automatic transmission</td><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Better acceleration</td></tr><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Better control of a gasoline engine's speed range</td><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Better control over emissions</td></tr><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Can incorporate automated versions of mechanical clutches</td><td style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left; font-weight: normal; padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px; padding-bottom: 3px; padding-left: 3px; ">Replace inefficient fluid torque converters</td></tr><tr style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; "></tr></t></table>
When you step on the gas pedal of a car with a continuously variable transmission, you notice the difference immediately. The engine revs up toward the rpms at which it produces the most power, and then it stays there. But the car doesn't react immediately. Then, a moment later, the transmission kicks in, accelerating the car slowly, steadily and without any shifts. In theory, a car with a CVT should reach 60 mph (100 km/hr) 25-percent faster than the same car with the same engine and a manual transmission. That's because the CVT converts every point on the engine's operating curve to a corresponding point on its own operating curve.If you look at the power output curve for the car without a CVT, you can see this to be true. Notice that the tachometer in this situation shows the engine revving up and down with each gear change, which is recorded as a spike in the power output curve (and which the driver feels as a jolt).CVTs are equally efficient on hills. There is no "gear hunting," because the CVT cycles steplessly down to a gear ratio appropriate for the driving conditions. A conventional automatic transmission shifts back and forth trying to find the right gear, which is far less efficient.
 

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Just been told today my order may now be January - Tekna CVT - not too pleased, but all subject to change.......
 

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12Inchmick,
what a fantastic explanation of the various kinds of CVT!! Definitely a Gold Star for that!!

Does anybody know which kind of CVT is fitted to the Juke?

I imagine the system used on the Juke must be very reliable?

Many years ago, I had a DAF 55, with CVT. there were two rubberised belts. Not very successful because one belt would always fail but the second belt enabled me to complete my journey, to enable replacement.

More recently, I owned a three wheel scooter with CVT. Quite basic and the belt required changing aftersome miles of use.
 

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Ah, that must be it. Spain must be at least 100 miles closer to Japan than the UK
When we ordered back in July we were told November, then December, now mid February. Annoying for me that you can get earlier delivery in Spain. Have you checked delivery with your dealer recently?

Had a brief test drive today. My wife did not like the gearbox so is happy that she has ordered the auto box. When I drive the new car it will be sport mode and manual change of the auto box. Shame it does not have steering wheel mounted paddles like my BMW
 

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Dougal, I said that the box has 6 fixed ratios as well as CVT mode. Similar box is fitted to the Quasquai. That's why the brochure describes the 4wd turbo model as "CVT-M6 4WD" and the non 4WD as "CVT".
 
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