Nissan Juke Owners Club banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 61 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,i have the 1.6 juke 2WD manual and i got to say, the car is awesome for its money. as for the bold looks, either you love it or hate it. but i would love to see this run with batteries like the nissan leaf ....im gonna ask nissan to see their reaction as it makes no sense at all to still promote petrol engines for city cars since the electric cars are for once again, out in the marketcheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,309 Posts
Hi harry and welcome to the forumWhat spec and colour have you gone for???...I think that there needs to be more charging stations for me to get excited about an electric car and the range needs to be improved before I would even consider one although I would consider a petrol/electric hybrid... or even I hear the possibility of a diesel/electric hybrid (not Nissan though)All the bestFee x
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
998 Posts
Hi , Electric cars ?, what is the cost of replacement batteries inc fitting when they have had it, quite expensive I would assume. No offence meant as it still might work out cheaper than oil based technology overall. But for me the batteries would have to be as good as new until they completely packed up not slowly fading in capacity, slowly reducing the mileage that you could do until having to replace them. T
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
160km range is more than enough for a small island like Cyprus. I bought the Juke 1.6 2WD force red with sports premium package (touchscreen with satnav and reverse camera were added by factory for free :) )

although i get 13 km per liter, 7.5 liters per 100km, it still makes no sense selling/promoting city cars with petrol engines. They try to lower emmissions, get the best milage possible, start-stop functinality but all these are symptoms of the problem....Fix the problem and symptoms will go away....Car instudries could give the technology (not that it is rocket science nor did they reinvent the wheel) to every factory to build low cost batteries and motors. Cause at the end of the day, what's an electric car? 4 motors and a battery pack...they did this back in the 50s...it's now 2011and imagine up to wherethe evolution on electric motors could reachif these companies gave to their scientists a project of upgrading existing motor technologies and batteries. for instance, find a way to recharge the batteries while on the move...that's your projectorin a year's time, present to us the best, most efficient DC motor we can possibly builtwe invented the atomic bomb, tens of thousands of engineers working on it (if only they had a different project i.e. feed the whole world) look at F1 cars and their technology....our capabilities are limitless160km range is marketing tool from those @@@-sucking satan little helpers. If we agree that the range is due to weight of car, then instead of aluminum or steel as frame and shell, they could use a different material....lot stronger and lighter than any metalim just planting seeds hoping one day will make roots :)cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
well the jukes not exactly a "city" car in the same way a smart 42 is, nor is a very "green" car.Battery power will never take off as it isn't a true green alternative, i wont go in to all the blah blah about mines in china, transport cost etc etc.
only when hydrogen is sorted will you see wide spread changes. interestingly enough, it's the reason why ford still invest heavily in the wenkel rotary engine because it can run of hydrogen...
Sean
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
or it could be what the Bowler Nemesis offroader uses....GRP composite (twin-tex with carbon fibre)...stronger and lighter than any metal used for the body of the car
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
the issue with hydrogen, is the energy needed for electrolysis....and then once again, you are depending on hydrogen suppliers...which will be the usual suspects...BP, mobil and EXXON
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
Harry said:
it still makes no sense selling/promoting city cars with petrol engines. They try to lower emmissions, get the best milage possible, start-stop functinality but all these are symptoms of the problem....Fix the problem and symptoms will go away....
Just because they promote the Nissan Leaf, doesn't mean that can't promote the Nissan Juke. You wouldn't see Apple "just" advertising the iPad 2. There's the iPod range, iPhone's, Macbook and so forth.It doesn't mean one is better than the other, it simply means each have a different market to account for.

Symptoms of what problem? In the 70's & 80's cars were getting 25mpg, the fuel was half the price then, however now we're getting double the mpg. Ergo, we're in the same situation today. People think fuel is expensive, but with more economical cars being produced there is barely any difference.

Let's not forget where the electricity that charges these new electric cars come from, either. Little fuel stations, using oils to operate. Same problem.

The issue is not with what fuel we use, it's with how much TAX the Government issues against it. When hydro cars become available, water will become £1.38a litre, or whatever the current rate is.

Enjoy your Juke!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
873 Posts
beltanedeath said:
well the jukes not exactly a "city" car in the same way a smart 42 is, nor is a very "green" car.Battery power will never take off as it isn't a true green alternative, i wont go in to all the blah blah about mines in china, transport cost etc etc.
only when hydrogen is sorted will you see wide spread changes. interestingly enough, it's the reason why ford still invest heavily in the wenkel rotary engine because it can run of hydrogen...
Sean
That's a load of rubbish, just because Top Gear said that doesn't make it true. Hydrogen is pushed by the oil companies as they are the ones supplying it - but to get hydrogen you have to pump horrific amounts of electricity through water (far more than an electric car would use), and then manage to transport it to stations where they can charge you just as much as they do for petrol due to the transport infrastructure still required. Electric cars are FAR more green and far more sensible an approach in my opinion.

I am a big supporter of electric cars, and really hope to get one as soon as it becomes practical for me - by which I mean, having my own parking space with charging unit. I currently live in flats with a shared car park so not practical to charge at home at the moment!

The issue about 'well electricity generation pollutes' is also a non argument, as more investment in power generation will quickly sort that out. Several million oil burning cars out there is a much harder problem to solve ecologically than 20 odd power stations, which are being improved all the time.

Totally agree the whole range anxiety thing is a total non issue for 99% of journeys. For the other 1%, you can hire a petrol/diesel.

I find it hilarious that there are thousands of electric car users across the world using them without problems, yet there are thousands of others with their fingers in their ears saying "LA LA LA ELECTRIC CARS DON'T WORK LA LA" when clearly, they do.

It's inevitable, it makes so much sense, and I look forward to owning one myself as soon as I can charge one at home!

Edited by: Stormrider
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Wingman, i think you missed the point completely.. nissan makes cars....they launched the leaf....full electric, top notch technology... you cannot compareit with apple....apple has many gadjets for different applications...whereas, a car either running on batteries or petrol takes you from a to b...simple as thattake Intel for instance...you think they stillproducing and selling brand new Pentium CPUs?? no...they moved on and try to keep up with technology. that's all im saying. Petrol served us even though it made and still makes moreharm than good but ok, let's move on. Nissan was bold enough and kudos to the engineers, to launch the first 5 door hatchback. all im saying and im planting seeds which apparently died in your garden :) is hopefully they continue working on this technology and stop selling and manufacturing petrol engine carsyou say about hydrogen...im totally against hydrogen as i said to a previous post. electrolysis wastes too much electricity and then you depend on the same companies and corporations for their fuel..i hope people wake up and understand this before we become hydrogen junkies and BP being the main dealer and producer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
storm, im not going to get in an argument with you, but just because i hold a different opinion to you doesn't make mine rubbish.
For the record, my opinion isn't based on an BBC entertainment show it's based on my own research of the subject.Electric cars do work, but very limitedly and cost prohibitively and still isn't "green" and that am afraid is a fact.
Sean
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Ok ok...so what you are saying here is this:petrol engines burn oilhydrogen fuel still needs to burn oil to produce theelectricity to break down water and get the H2electric cars still need to burn oil to produce the electricity to charge themso where we at???? maybe a car that runs on pure air so EVERYBODY is "green" happy??? yes, electric cars do leave a CO2 footprint duringmanufacturing the car, (like a petrol run one), when they manufacture the components (guess what, same goes for petrol run cars) and to produce the juice (electricity). Well :) oh my god...guess what...oil rigs dont pump out pure 95 octane petrol!!! did you calculate this co2 footprint (to purify oil nto 95, 98 and 100 octanes)on the CO2 emmissions of a petrol car?? not really...did they calculate the same CO2 footprint while manufacturing the car? not really.....so juke is 140g/km...well add another 140g during built, purifing the oil, importing metal and materials...only then you can compare an electric car's footprint to a petrol burning oneyou have a chance to stop burning oil during driving....and you still complain and find this solution not right??? you prefer to keep buying your fuel from corporations who vary the prices according to their needs and pleasure, killing our planet with pollution and harmful gases? you prefer to keep paying 50 euro for 400kms instead of5 euro for same range.....ok, i guess each to their ownas for power plants, at least you in the UK produce a big part of your electricity from tidal wave generators and wind turbines. PErsonally, my house runs with a 6KWsolar panel arrayand a 4KW wind turbine. so no, electricity to charge your car does not have to come only from oil burning power plants.the current range of the leaf is 160km....yes, doesnt sound that much although it suits the majority of people's needs...but this is the beginning. do you know the range of cars in the 60s and 70s??? it wasnt as much as nowadays and this is expectedit's not that we dont have the brains or the technology to make electric cars to run to their maximum capabilities....something called "profit" blocks us from reaching this point and holds back the technology to consumersyou really think that in 5 years let's say, an electric car would still need 12 hours to charge on a 230Volts power suppply? of course not...and it's idiotic to expect a brand new concept to work from the start and meet the needs for4 billion drivers (out of the 7 billion people living on this planet)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
873 Posts
This is a good quote:

So now, I’m 35, live in a flat in a city, have an electric car parked
over an induction charging plate set in the road. All the electricity
in the country is from renewable sources and I’m not interested in cars.


Then I read an article about these new engines, petrol engines. They
explode a highly flammable liquid in a cylinder which turns a crank
which turns a flywheel which turns a complicated, heavy gearbox and
clutch, which turns a drive shaft which turns the wheels. When I stop
laughing, I read on.


The fuel I will need to make this machine operate has to be drilled
out of the ground in Arabia and shipped to the UK in massive tankers. It
then has to be refined in huge industrial plants that use copious
amounts of electricity, it’s then shipped to a very expensive
installation called a petrol station. I then have to stop, pump this
dangerous liquid into the tank in my car. When the complicated engine is
running, it not only makes a lot of noise, the gas that comes out of
the exhaust pipe is poisonous, the engine creates huge amounts of waste
heat which requires a massive, energy sapping cooling system, the fuel
is very expensive and finite, it will run out. I throw my head back in
hoots of laughter and put the kettle on. Ridiculous, it’ll never catch
on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
484 Posts
Sorry I won't be buying a G-Wiz or a Leaf

</font>For
me, the issues regarding electric cars are:<?: prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" />

</font>

</font>1. Their range, or lack
of (see report below). In winter, I would regard myself as lucky just to make
it home from work.

</font>2. Their cost.

</font>3. Where do you charge
them? A majority of people can’t even park outside their home, nor have their own turbine.

</font><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Nissan has touted the Leaf as being the first mass-produced electric car
to market, complete with a 100 mile range on battery power alone. But now a new
report by Edmunds suggests that
actual range will vary tremendously, by as much as 91 miles according to tests
performed by Nissan.[/i]

</font><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Officially,
the Leaf is suggested to have a 100 mile range based on the EPA’s LA4 test
cycle, yet five tests performed by Nissan simulating varying
environmental and driving conditions suggest a range variance of 91 miles,
ranging from a low of 47 miles to a high of 138 miles. Of the five tests
performed, one was based on a Japanese test, and the following four were based
on U.S. driving cycles, according to Edmunds:[/i]

</font><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">*[/i]<i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;"> 138 miles while cruising
at 38 miles an hour with an outside temperature of 68 degrees Fahrenheit

* 105 miles at a fairly steady 24 mph in city traffic with the air
conditioner off and an ambient temperature of 77

* 70 miles at a steady 55 mph on the highway on a hot 95-degree day with
the air conditioning on

* 62 miles in the winter – 14 degrees outdoors – with heater on and
stop-and-go traffic reduced to an average 15 mph crawl[/i]

</font><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">The
fifth example was, according to Nissan spokeswoman Katharine Zachary, based on
“extreme driving conditions in a market outside of the U.S.” This extreme test
resulted in a total range of only <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;">47
miles[/b], and occurred during heavy stop-and-go traffic conditions averaging
just 6 miles per hour, while using the air conditioning on the maximum level to
offset an 86 degree exterior temperature.[/i]

</font><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">These
rather extreme fluctuations in range due to temperature extremes or traffic
conditions are not new to electric vehicles, as Leftlane discussed in an article discussing the <a href="http://www.leftlanenews.com/israel-becomes-ev-front-runner-as-battery-prices-fall.html" target="_blank">emerging push
for electrification of vehicles in Israel
</a>.[/i]

</font><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Range
reduction due to weather is also not exclusive to electric vehicles, as
gas-electric hybrids have also been reported to drop in range dramatically
during extreme weather, particularly with extreme cold. This unavoidable fact
may worsen the already prominent “range anxiety” that many would-be electric
vehicle buyers suggest is the main reason for them sticking to tried and true
petroleum-powered transportation.[/i]

</font>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
873 Posts
Costs will come down, the charging network will increase, range will increase. Of course electric vehicles aren't practical for a lot of people yet, but then neither was the petrol engined vehicle when they first emerged.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
873 Posts
beltanedeath said:
storm, im not going to get in an argument with you, but just because i hold a different opinion to you doesn't make mine rubbish.
For the record, my opinion isn't based on an BBC entertainment show it's based on my own research of the subject.Electric cars do work, but very limitedly and cost prohibitively and still isn't "green" and that am afraid is a fact.
Sean
Cost prohibitive? If you've done your own research you'll know that current hydrogen cars cost in the order of a quarter of a million pounds, and electric cars can be had for £25-30k. Hydrogen is also a lot less green (and a lot more expensive) in its production than electricity.
 
1 - 20 of 61 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top